Tag Archives: Justice

Intern Spotlight

Meet our Health & Justice Summer Intern, Dana Corral!

School: Gonzaga Law SchoolDana Picture
Year: 2L
Hometown: Livermore, CA

I had the chance to sit down with Dana during her last week here at the center and talk to her about her time here.

Why did you want to intern for CFJ?

I’ve done a lot of transactional law and I was interested in diversifying and being able to get into a different area of law. Working in a type of law with a more human element and where there is more gravity in the decisions made. Also being able to work somewhere that is actively helping the community was something I found very appealing.

Favorite part of interning for CFJ?

Going to court with Barry and working on representing unlawful detainers. Having the opportunity to represent disadvantaged clients in this case tenants, has been very rewarding. I’ve had such a great experience being able to watch a lawyer like Barry zealously advocate for the rights of those who so often go unrepresented. It is such important work, in a lot of cases it is the difference between someone keeping their home or becoming homeless.

What have you learned while working for CFJ?

Law is very inaccessible to most people because of how expensive it is. There is such a dire need for agencies that provide low cost legal aid. So many people just don’t understand the system, or have nowhere to go to get the help they need other than places like the CFJ. There is such a natural bias in the system to rule in favor of the plaintiff especially in landlord tenant issues. These landlords typically understand the system and have the money to take advantage of it while most of the time our clients lack the understanding and the resources.

Supervisor Quote: “My only regret with Dana is that she is not going to be with us longer – her persistence and perspective were incredibly valuable.”-Barry Pfundt

 

Retreat Yourself

Retreat Yourself

by Haley B. Brown (Center for Justice Legal Intern/Women Leading With Purpose Retreat Attendee ‘16)

As I drove up to Coeur D’Alene with two of my classmates for a weekend away from law school, I started to panic. We all started to panic.

“Did you get all of your reading done for next week?”

“I already feel behind not spending my weekend at the library”

“How will I be able to get ahead of my reading schedule now?”

“I’m too busy to be here.”

But, as we forced ourselves to chat about things outside the realm of law school over sour gummy candy, with the view of CDA Lake fast approaching, that panic began to melt away.

The Women Leading with Purpose Retreat is an annual event run through the Center for Justice for female law students at Gonzaga University School of Law. The Retreat provides those that decide to attend a weekend away from law school on the beautiful CDA lake, little to no cell service, time for personal reflection, relationship building, and much more.

I had just completed my first semester of law school at Gonzaga when I attended the retreat, and had already convinced myself that it was going to be a lonely, miserable three years. All of my free-time that I once filled with hobbies that enriched my life seemed to vanish. I rarely saw my husband and all of my girlfriends were now states away. (Not to mention, on top of figuring out my first semester of law school I was in the midst of trying to learn how to drive my husband’s car, a manual 5-speed, after we sold my vehicle to save money for school. This was like the least amount of fun I have ever had in my entire life. . . but, I digress.) Law school was all consuming; it consumed all of my time, all of my thoughts and all of my conversations. I didn’t feel like myself and was experiencing more self-doubt that I ever had before. To top it all off, I was convinced I was the only one of my classmates who was experiencing this. Most people seemed like they had it all figured out.

The Retreat taught me that law school doesn’t have to be lonely or miserable. In fact, I learned that I was surrounded by strong, supportive female classmates who had experiences just like mine that will enrich my law school experience and provide me a shoulder to lean on, cry on, or stand on if necessary. But, had it not been for the retreat, I am not sure I would have had the chance (or the courage), to get to know the 11 classmates I spent my weekend with on the deep personal level that I did. Until that time, most conversations I had with these women and all of my other classmates were school related and surface level. I left that weekend more committed to developing deep, personal relationships in school, work and in my personal life.

Additionally, being at the retreat afforded me the time to look inward, reflect and morph back into the person that I was before coming to law school. I left feeling more like myself with a renewed sense of purpose, a louder voice, and a reminder of why I chose to come to law school in the first place. I also left committed to learning how to bake bread, something I had been continually putting off with criminal law reading.

Like all good things, the retreat had to come to an end. As my two classmates and I headed back to the reading, outlines, flashcards, and significant others that awaited our return, not one of us felt panicked. Instead, we felt and continue to feel empowered and driven to be women leading with purpose.

Rise for Justice results & more!

We are almost speechless! The Center for Justice hosted its very first Rise for Justice breakfast on May 19th at the Davenport Grand Hotel. The event results are above and beyond what we could have hoped for! Here is quick recap of the proceedings. The event began at 7:30 am with a welcome and thank you from Matt Santangelo. Matt is the Executive Director for Spokane Hoopfest Association and we were very grateful for his willingness to act as our Master of Ceremonies for this event. With 435 guests in attendance, the room was full of passionate community members who care about social justice issues in Spokane. Several elected officials and judges were also in attendance as well, each of whom were recognized during Matt’s introduction. Following the introduction, our Executive Director, Rick Eichstaedt, was introduced and then recognized the Board of Directors and table hosts for their efforts, concluding with an introduction of our notable keynote speaker, Justice Mary I. Yu. She spoke about the need for civil legal aid in Washington and the importance of organizations like the Center as key players in the community. She referred to Spokane as a “beacon of hope” for the rest of the state, and touched on the importance of the work being done by the center here in Spokane. Following her speech, Matt came back up to thank Justice Yu and then to introduce a video produced by Hamilton Studio that gave a wonderful synopsis of the work done at the Center. The 12 minute video featured attorneys and program staff members and demonstrated all of the ways the Center interacts in the community. Following the video, Sharon Smith took the stage and gave a compelling and heartfelt call to action. Once Sharon had finished and instructed table hosts on how to collect donations, Matt gave another thank you to all of the attendees and concluded the event with an inspirational quote from Dr. Cornell West: “Justice is what LOVE looks like in public.”

The event was an overwhelming success, with a net profit of approximately $43,500, exceeding the amount we had anticipated and the goal previously set. The 54 table hosts all did a fantastic job and filled their tables with generous and interested community members!

This event would not have been possible without our hard working event committee that consisted of Elsa Distelhorst, Patty Gates, Kim Harmson, Jake Krummel, and Lorna St. John. A special thank you as well to our table sponsors, Mary Alberts, Micheal Chappell, Elsa Distelhorst, Foster Pepper PLLC,  Kim and Jeff Harmson, Kalispel Tribe and Northern Quest Resort & Casino, Merriman Wealth Management, Neighborhood Alliance of Spokane County, Numerica Credit Union, and Smith-Barbieri Progressive Fund. We would like to send a special shout out to our Media Partner, Don Hamilton and Lorna St. John from Hamilton Studio and our video host, Jake Krummel of Numerica, for the impressive video! We are also grateful to Robert Lee, Della Higgins, Bill Keizer, Dr. Darin Neven and Ben Stuckart for their openness to celebrate and share our work with the community. Finally, a huge thank you to our friend and sponsor, Sharon Smith, for leading the vital community call to action.

In case you missed it…check out the video below!

 

 

Community Court

 

IMG_0179I was walking in downtown Spokane on my way to the library headed to Community Court. It is where all the cool kids hang out on Mondays mid-morning to early afternoon. Why do we hang out there, you may ask. Because we care about our community, because we want to help people, we want to make an impact.

Who are these cool kids and what do they do at the downtown library? We are a ragtag group of community organizations that collaborates with the courts to get disadvantaged (and usually impoverished) people the services they need.

Community Court is open to everyone but many start through the courts, as low level, non-violent offenders that would otherwise be jailed for minor offences that are often related their homelessness, drug or alcohol dependency or mental illness. Putting them in jail for minor offenses is expensive for the city and doesn’t help these folks. So the prosecutors, public defenders and the judge collaborate with community organizations to get them services instead.

There are a variety of organizations there to help people get signed up for mental health services, housing, public benefits and oh so much more. I go to represent the Center for Justice and to help people sign up for Medicaid or Washington Apple Health as it’s known in these parts.

Back to my story. I continued my stroll through downtown. IMG_0166The sun was shining, the air was crisp and not many people were out. I always enjoy the walk when the weather is nice. It’s only about a half a mile from my office and the stretch runs along beautiful Riverfront Park with its artwork, fountain and the river running right through the middle of it.

As I got close to crossing the street near the library, a bicyclist sped by and made eye contact. I gave a little nod and he nodded back. He was long and lean and a stocking cap covered much of his head but I could make out some short dreads underneath. He was holding a large piece of cardboard in one hand as he raced by.

I got to the library and settled in at my table with all the other service providers. Said my hellos to friends and set up my computer and my vast array of pamphlets. It got busy.

The tall cyclist came wandering in and sat at my table. He introduced himself. He had the name of a little town in California not too far from where I used to live in my youth. Hearing it brought a smile to my face.

He was soft spoken and polite. He looked like a guy who had just fallen on hard times and was trying to get himself back on track. I signed him up for healthcare without a hitch. He thanked me and left my table. I distractedly went on about my work and finished up for the day.

As I was walking out in a slew of others leaving, he came running up to me from behind. He was out of breath as he handed me the folded piece of cardboard. I opened it up and thanked him. He was gone in a flash. This is what he left behind. I think sharing his artwork was his way of extending a little gratitude for the help I had given him.

 

Comm Court pic

click the links below for more about community court

http://www.inlander.com/spokane/a-new-approach/Content?oid=2243257

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2016/apr/19/spokanes-community-court-gets-200000-boost/

http://www.spokanelibrary.org/community-court/

Fair Chance Hiring

By Julie Schaffer

March 2016

“Fair Chance Hiring,” also known as “Ban the Box,” is finally getting some much deserved airtime in Spokane. This is welcome news to the 1 in 4 individuals who have a criminal record and who desperately want to tell potential employers why they are the best pick for the job, an opportunity many of them do not get because of the box on the application that asks about criminal history.  Research shows that people who check the box rarely move forward in the hiring process, regardless of whether or not they qualify for the job, how long ago their conviction was, what it was for, or what they’ve done since that time.  To prevent this arbitrary rejection, and to ensure that employers are not missing out on undiscovered talent, 21 states and over 100 jurisdictions have mandated that employers delay asking about criminal history until later in the hiring process – ideally until after the applicant pool has been narrowed based on qualifications and after face-to-face interviews.  Under such policies, employers can still do background checks, they can still ask applicants about their criminal history, and they can still hire the best fit for the job.

Most policies apply to public employers (like City of Spokane’s current policy), but more and more jurisdictions are mandating that private employers comply as well. Why?  Because it’s the right thing to do (we used to allow businesses to disqualify people of color and women), it increases public safety by dramatically reducing the chance that someone will commit another crime, reduces reliance on public benefits, increases the tax base and helps the local economy, ensures that employers aren’t missing out on highly qualified employees, reduces costs related to incarceration, reduces racial disparity in hiring (people of color are disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system and therefore suffer more from “the box,” and it allows people who have served their time to return to our community and help us make it thrive.

We are pleased that our city councilmembers are currently exploring whether to require private employers in Spokane to delay background checks until after the initial application stage, something the City has been doing (without incident) for the past year. City Council hosted a Fair Chance Hiring Forum on March 8 to educate themselves and the community more about this issue.  Councilmembers Stuckart and Beggs organized the forum, along with Smart Justice Spokane member orgs CFJ, PJALs and I Did the Time.  District Court Judge Richard Leland graciously moderated with humor and a genuine interest in how this relates to the cycle of crime he sees every day on the bench.  Approximately 100 people showed up (during the Gonzaga WCC championship game!), and it played live on City Cable 5 (Forum Video).  A WSU PhD student presented research showing that employment dramatically reduces crime, CFJ presented the common elements of fair chance hiring laws, and formerly incarcerated individuals courageously shared their personal stories of healing, change, education, and then heartbreaking rejection by ‘the box.”  The evening ended with a diverse panel of business people who have voluntarily removed the box with great results, the City’s Chief Civil Service Examiner who is implementing the City’s Fair Chance Hiring policy, GSI’s new CEO Todd Mielke, and the leader of I Did the Time Layne Pavey.  The discussion was rich and honest, and I believe it demonstrated that there is enough common ground and shared love for this community to create fair hiring in Spokane.

To learn more, visit www.nelp.org/campaign/ensuring-fair-chance-to-work, and watch the Forum Video.  And please spread the word and tell council members what you think (their emails are below).  Our leaders need to hear that the people in this community support Fair Chance Hiring!

Ben Stuckart bstuckart@spokanecity.org

Amber Waldref awaldref@spokanecity.org

Mike Fagan  mfagan@spokanecity.org

Candace Mumm cmumm@spokanecity.org

Karen Stratton   kstratton@spokanecity.org

Lori Kinnear   lkinnear@spokanecity.org

Breean Beggs   bbeggs@spokanecity.org

Hurt lingers 10 years after Zehm’s death

By Jeffry Finer / Special to The Spokesman-Review

I remember Otto Zehm.

Working downtown, I would see him from time to time walking, loping really – he walked fast and bounced from step to step – but I never so much as said hello. I did not know he was a musician, or that he had mental illness, that he sometimes heard things the rest of us didn’t. I knew he had the longest golden hair of anyone on the Spokane street scene. And he sang quietly to himself. He smiled but did not seem to want attention. He moved along in his own world. He’d be surprised what his name has come to mean. And how often city leaders and media cite his life and death.

For Spokane, his name evokes strong reactions.

Some see Otto’s death on a personal level. He was beloved by his family (mother, sister and cousins were closest). He was respected and liked at work (at the nonprofit Skils’kin, where he was a janitor). Friends said he was careless with generosity and would give you his only coat if he saw you were cold. Everyone knew him to be gentle.

Most of Spokane, of course, knows about his death in 2006 after two days on life support. We watched local media play and replay his videotaped beating and restraint by a half-dozen local police officers. We know about the City Hall cover-up, the federal criminal case and Officer Karl Thompson’s conviction.

For some of us, the “system worked.” For others, the aftermath of Otto’s death was a system failure that ruined a good cop.

If you voted in February 2013 for Proposition 1, and 70 percent of Spokane voters did, you remember Otto as the poster child for passage of a strongly worded demand for an independent police ombudsman. And unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know the office of the ombudsman is in tatters.

Spokane tries to move on.

Officer Thompson has served his time and just this month has been released. The Use of Force Commission met for a year, issued two dozen specific recommendations and dissolved. Some recommendations have taken hold; others, such as changes to Spokane’s “police culture,” have not.

Local civil rights advocates press on – working hard to see that we get the independent ombudsman we overwhelmingly voted for, moving “smart justice” reforms ahead to fix our broken criminal justice system, and pushing the city to hire a new chief of police who is committed to implement the changes our community needs. Other law enforcement issues have come under scrutiny, such as the understaffed jail, its lack of nurses and timely medical services. Just more budget-driven problems facing us and every city and county in America.

Overall? We have yet to heal our relationship with our own peace officers. They have yet to heal their relationship with us.

On the day Officer Thompson was taken into custody, the Friday after the verdict finding him guilty of excessive force and lying in a federal investigation, I sat in the gallery behind Assistant Chief Craig Meidl. He and some four dozen men and women – off-duty police officers sworn to uphold the law – snapped to salute as federal marshals led Officer Thompson away. Otto’s middle-age cousins seated with me were stunned into silence. We looked for help but the court had left and its staff seemed powerless.

In 30 years, I’ve never felt such repressed tension in a courtroom. The marshals, wisely I think, took Thompson away uncuffed and the officers gradually left the courtroom. My apology to the Zehm cousins for the salute brought a cold stare from two officers. At the elevator, another officer blamed the sole reporter present for causing Thompson’s conviction.

It is said that no one should be judged solely by their worst day; and in that sense Officer Thompson’s supporters may have been feeling a conflicted affinity for him. But it remains troubling that the department has failed to account to the public for the embrace by 50 of its officers of a convicted felon. Troubling that there has been no apology and no consequences.

A lot needs doing to restore our faith and trust in our police. Their work requires such trust as surely as we require faithful police. The Center for Justice, where I work with a team of lawyers and community activists, coordinates with citizens, police and local officials to make our city safer and fairer for everyone.

Sometimes the struggle goes on quietly in meetings, or noisily in the media. But a certain spirit of gentleness inspires us at times to keep a memory of Otto Zehm alive. Not only as saber-rattling social change warriors but as neighbors, colleagues, friends and people who remember Otto Zehm.

Medical-Legal Partnerships: A Comprehensive Problem Requiring a Comprehensive Solution

MLP Image copy for blog

A huge thanks to our intern, Jerusha Dressel of Whitworth University, for researching and writing this blog post about one of our newest program areas, the Health & Justice Initiative.

 

Medical-Legal Partnerships: A Comprehensive Problem Requiring a Comprehensive Solution

Health care staff at Boston Medical Center, in the winter of 2010, found themselves faced with a problem that appeared to be propagating itself: patients living in sub-standard housing and suffering from chronic diseases would come in to receive treatment only to afterwards return to the same conditions, such as lack of heat, that initially provoked the issue.

It is evident how this could quickly become a self-perpetuating cycle:

  • A patient becomes ill due to asthma complications and consequently cannot go into work.
  • The individual loses income and cannot pay their utilities for the month.
  • The patient’s heat is turned off in their apartment, worsening the asthma issues.

Although regulations in Boston were set up to prevent those suffering from chronic conditions from having utilities turned off, they required paperwork to be filled out by the doctors themselves. Utilizing the resources provided by a medical-legal partnership (MLP), workers at Boston Medical Center were able to ensure that patients were receiving the legal protection they were entitled to under the law. Medical staff, though, found themselves overwhelmed with the paperwork from the massive amounts of individuals in need of a certification to keep their utilities from being turned off. Working as a team, medical and legal professionals were able to encourage regulation changes that lessened the paperwork required to guarantee legal protections for those dealing with certain medical issues. Because of the efforts of this MLP, 10,000 individuals with asthma and 400 with sickle cell are now less likely to need to visit a health care professional as a result of complications from their conditions and the burden on health care providers has been lessened.[1]

Problems similar to those faced by Boston Medical Center occur regularly. Health care and legal professionals employ different perspectives on patient-client issues. Health care professionals concern themselves with the medical side of the problem (e.g. helping the patient recover), whereas legal workers deal with the “justice” side of the issue (e.g. mold in an apartment building in violation of city code).[2] While both are working with aspects of the issue, they have not seen it as one broad issue, or even if they have, they have not been able to find a means to successfully, holistically combat the problem.

The problem facing health care and legal workers is like a puzzle. However, instead of being all together in the same box, the pieces are distributed to different individuals who have no interaction with one another. The lawyer has his or her group of pieces and can assemble a good portion of the puzzle to provide part of a solution, yet the lawyer has no clue as to what the doctor’s portion of the pieces look like and vice-versa. Thus, as much as these individuals may attempt to finish the puzzle and solve the problem, they cannot succeed because they are both lacking critical components. MLPs represent an effort to bring together all of the puzzle pieces.

According to the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Undeserved: “Medical-legal partnerships (MLPs) seek to eliminate barriers to healthcare and improve the health of vulnerable and underserved populations by integrating legal assistance into the medical setting. These partnerships resolve various legal needs related to health (including medical insurance, Social Security benefits, housing, employment, and family problems) by affording medical patients the benefits and protections of legal services.”[3]

Basically, MLPs represent a partnership of legal and medical professionals. These organizations provide legal aid to patients suffering from chronic diseases. According to the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, MLPs have four different avenues through which they further their goal:

  1. They teach health care and legal professionals how to together recognize potential health threats in the patient’s social environment before they become major issues.
  2. MLPs use laws in place to combat these health threats.
  3. The organizations strive to alter the policies of health care providers so that they are more readily equipped to react to potential health threats to the patent.
  4. These institutions make an effort to preclude additional health hazards through the implementation of new rules regarding health issues.[4]

Today there are more than 275 MLPs stretched across thirty-eight states in the U.S., the majority existing in suburban areas. They are legal aid, changes to health and legal organizations and modification of regulations.[5] These groups place “lawyers and paralegals alongside health care teams to detect, address and prevent health-harming social conditions for people and communities.”[6] MLPs increase medical professionals’ awareness of the consequences of the legal structure on the individual’s health care while opening up the eyes of lawyers to the potential benefits of addressing problems before they become major issues

There have been several positive results of this partnership between medical and legal professionals. Among other benefits, the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership noted that individuals suffering from chronic diseases are “admitted to the hospital less frequently,” patients more regularly ingest prescribed medication and health care costs have been reduced for the patient and the health care provider.[7] The results of a study examining the impacts of rural MLPs revealed an over three hundred percent return on investment of the Medical-Legal Partnership of Southern Illinois over the course of three years.[8]

MLPs present a viable solution to very real problems facing individuals today. Ellen Lawton, director of the National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership at George Washington University, summed up the importance of a partnership between legal and health care professionals such as the one that exists in MLPs saying that, “As we focus on how to build healthier communities over the next 50 years, we must remember that health does not exist in a vacuum separate from wealth, from the laws we write, from the systems we create to protect our citizens, or from the injustices that exist in each of these things. We must aim for health and justice in all practices and in all policies, knowing that more often than not, they are the same thing.”[9] In order to tackle this self-perpetuating problem, it must be approached not as two separate problems, one for lawyers and one for health professionals, but rather as one single issue. MLPs represent the partnering of individuals working in separate fields towards the same ends.

[1] “Changing the law to keep the heat and lights on,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, November 1, 2010, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/utility-story/.
[2] “The Need for Medical-Legal Partnership,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, accessed February 1, 2016, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/need/.
[3] James A. Teufel, Danilea Werner, Diane Goffinet, Woody Thorne, Stephen L. Brown, and Lori Gettinger, “Rural Medical-Legal Partnership and Advocacy: A Three-Year Follow-up Study,” Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved 23, no. 2 (2012): 705-714, doi: 10.1353/hpu.2012.0038.
[4] “The MLP Response,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, accessed February 1, 2016, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/mlp-response/.
[5] Tishra Beeson, Brittany Dawn McAllister and Marsha Regenstein, “Making the Case for Medical-Legal Partnerships: A Review of the Evidence,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, February 2013,  accessed February 8, 2016, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Medical-Legal-Partnership-Literature-Review-February-2013.pdf.
[6] “The MLP Response.”
[7] “Impact at a Glance,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, accessed February 1, 2016, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/mlp-response/impact/; “FAQ,” National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership, accessed February 8, 2016, http://medical-legalpartnership.org/faq/.
[8] James A. Teufel, Danilea Werner, Diane Goffinet, Woody Thorne, Stephen L. Brown, and Lori Gettinger, 705-714.
[9] Ellen Lawton, “The Shared DNA of Health and Justice,” Huffington Post (blog), August 25, 2015 (4:05 p.m.), http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ellen-lawton/the-shared-dna-of-health-and-justice_b_8034788.html.

Partnership Supports Health of Poor

Barry Pfundt, Barry Pfundt, attorney for the Center for Justice.

SPOKANE, Washington – Unmet legal problems adversely impact the health of approximately 1 in 6 Americans, most especially the poor, according to National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership. A 2012 Spokane Regional Health District study demonstrated how Spokane’s poor have significantly reduced life expectancy. On Jan. 12, a new six-member community collaborative began providing free in-clinic legal services to address the legal needs compromising the health of low-income individuals in our community.

The partners include the Gonzaga University School of Law’s Center for Law and Justice, Providence Health Care, Empire Health Foundation, Washington State University Spokane, the Center for Justice, and faculty and residents at the Providence Residency Clinics. This one-year pilot program – funded by Providence Health Care, Empire Health Foundation, and WSU Spokane – will involve law students and medical residents working together to identify clients with health-compromising legal needs and use a team approach to address them. Faculty from GU Law and Providence Residency Clinics will supervise the students. The plan calls for 12 GU law students to work with 51 medical residents.

The students will work together to address issues such as safe housing – including unlawful evictions and landlord-tenant issues – and income maintenance concerns, such as obtaining and maintaining disability benefits. The National Center for Medical-Legal Partnership identified these concerns as among the most frequent challenges not being addressed. The partners’ first-year goal is to provide assistance to at least 100 clients with medical-legal concerns.

“If a child is getting sick because he lives in substandard housing, you could give him an inhaler to treat the asthma or you could help move him to a safe house where he isn’t being exposed to mold or other hazards,” explained Center for Justice Attorney Barry Pfundt, who will be supervising the new legal clinic. “We are not just treating symptoms, we are eliminating the root cause of the illness. And that’s something a doctor can’t always do by herself.”

In 2013, Pfundt helped launch the Center for Justice’s Health & Justice Initiative to increase collaboration between health care and legal service providers for the benefit of the community.

While serving patients is the core purpose of the new Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) Clinic, it will also provide unique opportunities for medical residents and law students. For law students, clinical programs provide an opportunity to work directly with clients, manage caseloads, and hone skills necessary as they begin a professional career. For medical residents, the program creates an opportunity to work in a multidisciplinary care setting that prepares them for the future. Studies have shown that the MLP model can improve health care job satisfaction by enabling health care providers to be more involved in discovering and addressing the root causes of poor health.

“The Medical-Legal Partnership gives WSU Spokane’s health sciences campus additional opportunities to invest in this community and to work, in a unique way, to improve health care in our city,” said Lisa Brown, chancellor of WSU Spokane.

“Spokane is a regional center for health services, and we also have some of our state’s highest rates of poverty,” said Pfundt. “The MLP addresses both of these facts – continuing our region’s leadership and innovation in health care, while addressing the health harming legal problems of those in need.”

Gonzaga University School of Law Center for Law and Justice

Established in 1974 as one of the first law school legal services clinics in the nation, the GU Law Center for Law and Justice is staffed by GU Law students and faculty that provide legal assistance to low-income, elderly, and nonprofit community members while providing law students with practical career training. On the web: www.law.gonzaga.edu.

Providence Health Care

In Eastern Washington, the Providence Health Care regional network consists of 11 health care organizations working together to provide quality health and human services for Inland Northwest residents. Providence Health Care is a part of the not-for-profit, faith based Providence Health & Services organization. On the web: www.phc.org.

Empire Health Foundation

An independent, nonprofit grant-making foundation that serves seven counties in Eastern Washington, Empire Health Foundation focuses on health access, education, research, and public policy. The Foundation is the largest private health foundation in the region. On the web: www.empirehealthfoundation.org

Washington State University, Spokane

Washington State University Spokane is WSU’s urban health sciences campus. Located in the heart of the University District near downtown Spokane, WSU Spokane prepares the state’s future generations of health professionals, and houses world-class research that leads to healthier people and communities. On the web: http://spokane.wsu.edu.

Center for Justice

The Center is a legal advocacy organization that helps thousands of local people with basic needs such as getting a driver’s license back or dealing with landlord abuses. The Center’s programs work to overcome barriers to employment, assist with getting families back on their feet, and keep governments accountable to those they are meant to serve. On the web: www.cforjustice.org.

For more information, contact Andrea Parrish, communications specialist at GU Law, at (509) 313-3771 or via email: aparrish@lawschool.gonzaga.edu.

Posted on January 8, 2015 on Gonzaga News online.